The Knife Man Blood Body Snatching And The Birth Of Modern Surgery Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Knife Man

The Knife Man

Author: Wendy Moore
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307419452
Pages: 352
Year: 2007-12-18
When Robert Louis Stevenson wrote his gothic horror story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, he based the house of the genial doctor-turned-fiend on the home of John Hunter. The choice was understandable, for Hunter was both widely acclaimed and greatly feared. From humble origins, John Hunter rose to become the most famous anatomist and surgeon of the eighteenth century. In an age when operations were crude, extremely painful, and often fatal, he rejected medieval traditions to forge a revolution in surgery founded on pioneering scientific experiments. Using the knowledge he gained from countless human dissections, Hunter worked to improve medical care for both the poorest and the best-known figures of the era—including Sir Joshua Reynolds and the young Lord Byron. An insatiable student of all life-forms, Hunter was also an expert naturalist. He kept exotic creatures in his country menagerie and dissected the first animals brought back by Captain Cook from Australia. Ultimately his research led him to expound highly controversial views on the age of the earth, as well as equally heretical beliefs on the origins of life more than sixty years before Darwin published his famous theory. Although a central figure of the Enlightenment, Hunter’s tireless quest for human corpses immersed him deep in the sinister world of body snatching. He paid exorbitant sums for stolen cadavers and even plotted successfully to steal the body of Charles Byrne, famous in his day as the “Irish giant.” In The Knife Man, Wendy Moore unveils John Hunter’s murky and macabre world—a world characterized by public hangings, secret expeditions to dank churchyards, and gruesome human dissections in pungent attic rooms. This is a fascinating portrait of a remarkable pioneer and his determined struggle to haul surgery out of the realms of meaningless superstitious ritual and into the dawn of modern medicine.
The Knife Man

The Knife Man

Author: Wendy Moore
Publisher: Broadway
ISBN: 0767916530
Pages: 341
Year: 2005
Explains how John Hunter, a brilliant but notorious surgeon, revolutionized surgical techniques and principles in eighteenth-century London, describing his contributions in the field of geology and evolution, as well as his development of innovative medical techniques and principles for successful transplants that transcended his time. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.
The Knife Man

The Knife Man

Author: Wendy Moore
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1409044629
Pages: 656
Year: 2010-09-30
WINNER OF THE MEDICAL JOURNALISTS' OPEN BOOK AWARD 2005 Revered and feared in equal measure, John Hunter was the most famous surgeon of eighteenth-century London. Rich or poor, aristocrat or human freak, suffering Georgians knew that Hunter's skills might well save their lives but if he failed, their corpses could end up on his dissecting table, their bones and organs destined for display in his remarkable, macabre museum. Maverick medical pioneer, adored teacher, brilliant naturalist, Hunter was a key figure of the Enlightenment who transformed surgery, advanced biological understanding and even anticipated the evolutionary theories of Darwin. He provided inspiration both for Dr Jekyll and Dr Dolittle. But the extremes to which he went to pursue his scientific mission raised question marks then as now. John Hunter's extraordinary world comes to life in this remarkable, award-winning biography written by a wonderful new talent.
Blood and Guts

Blood and Guts

Author: Richard Hollingham
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1429987324
Pages: 320
Year: 2009-12-08
Today, astonishing surgical breakthroughs are making limb transplants, face transplants, and a host of other previously un dreamed of operations possible. But getting here has not been a simple story of medical progress. In Blood and Guts, veteran science writer Richard Hollingham weaves a compelling narrative from the key moments in surgical history. We have a ringside seat in the operating theater of University College Hospital in London as world-renowned Victorian surgeon Robert Liston performs a remarkable amputation in thirty seconds—from first cut to final stitch. Innovations such as Joseph Lister's antiseptic technique, the first open-heart surgery, and Walter Freeman's lobotomy operations, among other breakthroughs, are brought to life in these pages in vivid detail. This is popular science writing at it's best.
Strange Medicine

Strange Medicine

Author: Nathan Belofsky
Publisher: TarcherPerigee
ISBN: 0399159959
Pages: 213
Year: 2013
This extraordinary true account of bad science, oafish behavior and nauseating procedures takes readers on a wild ride through medical history's dubious ideas, bizarre treatments and biggest blunders. Original.
Invasion of the Body

Invasion of the Body

Author: Nicholas L. Tilney
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674062280
Pages: 358
Year: 2011-09-26
In 1913, the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston admitted its first patient, Mary Agnes Turner, who suffered from varicose veins in her legs. The surgical treatment she received, under ether anesthesia, was the most advanced available at the time. At the same hospital fifty years later, Nicholas Tilneyâe"then a second-year residentâe"assisted in the repair of a large aortic aneurysm. The cutting-edge diagnostic tools he used to evaluate the patientâe(tm)s condition would soon be eclipsed by yet more sophisticated apparatus, including minimally invasive approaches and state-of-the-art imaging technology, which Tilney would draw on in pioneering organ transplant surgery and becoming one of its most distinguished practitioners. In Invasion of the Body, Tilney tells the story of modern surgery and the revolutions that have transformed the field: anesthesia, prevention of infection, professional standards of competency, pharmaceutical advances, and the present turmoil in medical education and health care reform. Tilney uses as his stage the famous Boston teaching hospital where he completed his residency and went on to practice (now called Brigham and Women's). His cast of characters includes clinicians, support staff, trainees, patients, families, and various applied scientists who push the revolutions forward. While lauding the innovations that have brought surgeons' capabilities to heights undreamed of even a few decades ago, Tilney also previews a challenging future, as new capacities to prolong life and restore health run headlong into unsustainable costs. The authoritative voice he brings to the ancient tradition of surgical invasion will be welcomed by patients, practitioners, and policymakers alike.
Bodysnatchers

Bodysnatchers

Author: Suzie Lennox
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 1473866561
Pages: 144
Year: 2016-09-30
In this chilling history of the bodysnatching trade, the stories of Britain's lesser known Resurrection Men are told. Here are the stories of the men who robbed graves during the winter months of 1742 - 1832, selling fresh cadavers to anatomists up and down the country all in aid of medical advancement. The murders of Burke and Hare often dominate the macabre tales of bodysnatching, but the stories of Henry Gillies, William Patrick and Joseph Grainger are all just as gruesome. Stories involving medical students and anatomists are retold as we discover the cases that have become hidden in history. Anatomy schools, short of fresh cadavers for dissection would pay high prices for corpses, asking no questions about their origins. This resulted in the criminal underworld of the ‘Sack ‘em up Men’ or bodysnatchers, which spread fear and horror throughout the United Kingdom. It’s time to discover these lesser known stories about Britain’s often forgotten history.
Surgery

Surgery

Author: Ira M. Rutkow
Publisher: Mosby Incorporated
ISBN: 0801660785
Pages: 550
Year: 1993
The book covers the span of years from the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt to the appearance of the surgical specialities in the first half of the 20th century.
How to Create the Perfect Wife

How to Create the Perfect Wife

Author: Wendy Moore
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465065732
Pages: 360
Year: 2013-04-09
Thomas Day, an 18th-century British writer and radical, knew exactly the sort of woman he wanted to marry. Pure and virginal like an English country maid yet tough and hardy like a Spartan heroine, she would live with him in an isolated cottage, completely subservient to his whims. But after being rejected by a number of spirited young women, Day concluded that the perfect partner he envisioned simply did not exist in frivolous, fashion-obsessed Georgian society. Rather than conceding defeat and giving up his search for the woman of his dreams, however, Day set out to create her. So begins the extraordinary true story at the heart of How to Create the Perfect Wife, prize-winning historian Wendy Moore’s captivating tale of one man’s mission to groom his ideal mate. A few days after he turned twenty-one and inherited a large fortune, Day adopted two young orphans from the Foundling Hospital and, guided by the writings of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and the principles of the Enlightenment, attempted to teach them to be model wives. After six months he discarded one girl, calling her “invincibly stupid,” and focused his efforts on his remaining charge. He subjected her to a number of cruel trials—including dropping hot wax on her arms and firing pistols at her skirts—to test her resolve but the young woman, perhaps unsurprisingly, eventually rebelled against her domestic slavery. Day had hoped eventually to marry her, but his peculiar experiment inevitably backfired—though not before he had taken his theories about marriage, education, and femininity to shocking extremes. Stranger than fiction, blending tragedy and farce, How to Create the Perfect Wife is an engrossing tale of the radicalism—and deep contradictions—at the heart of the Enlightenment.
Open And Shut Case, An: The Story Of Keyhole Or Minimally Invasive Surgery

Open And Shut Case, An: The Story Of Keyhole Or Minimally Invasive Surgery

Author: Wickham John
Publisher: World Scientific
ISBN: 1786341743
Pages: 352
Year: 2017-02-22
Keyhole surgery has been made possible through the rapid development of various medical technologies, first pioneered in the 1970s. Revolutionary in the way it reduced the risk, surgical complications, healing time and scarring compared to open surgery, keyhole surgery soon became the preferred method throughout many surgical specialities. Here, John Wickham, the 'godfather' of robotic surgery, reflects on a life spent in research, discovery and struggle for innovation in order to make keyhole surgery widespread, accessible and available to patients. An Open and Shut Case tracks the evolution of surgery in the later parts of the 20th century, from initial surgical training in the 1960s to the rapid growth in the field of minimally invasive techniques throughout the 1970s and 80s in many specialities, precursors to the techniques used today. It concludes with a look at the effect of the National Health Service on the practice of medicine and nursing in the UK throughout this time. Perfect for surgeons and those interested in the history of surgery and surgical techniques, it also focusses on lessons learnt, both good and bad, when dealing with the management of public health.
Body of Work

Body of Work

Author: Christine Montross
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1594201250
Pages: 295
Year: 2007
A first-year medical student describes an anatomy class during which she studied the donated body of a cadaver dubbed "Eve," an experience that profoundly influenced her subsequent studies and understanding of the human form.
Death, Dissection and the Destitute

Death, Dissection and the Destitute

Author: Ruth Richardson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226712400
Pages: 453
Year: 2000
In the early nineteenth century, body snatching was rife because the only corpses available for medical study were those of hanged murderers. With the Anatomy Act of 1832, however, the bodies of those who died destitute in workhouses were appropriated for dissection. At a time when such a procedure was regarded with fear and revulsion, the Anatomy Act effectively rendered dissection a punishment for poverty. Providing both historical and contemporary insights, Death, Dissection, and the Destitute opens rich new prospects in history and history of science. The new afterword draws important parallels between social and medical history and contemporary concerns regarding organs for transplant and human tissue for research.
Digging Up the Dead

Digging Up the Dead

Author: Druin Burch
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1446400174
Pages: 304
Year: 2010-10-31
A tearaway young man from Norfolk, Astley Cooper (1768-1841) became the world's richest and most famous surgeon. Admired from afar by the Brontës and up close by his student Keats, his success was born of an appetite for bloody revolutions. He set up an international network of bodysnatchers, won the Royal Society's highest prize and boasted to Parliament that there was no one whose body he could not steal. Experimenting on his neighbours' corpses and the living bodies of their stolen pets, his discoveries were as great as his infamy. Caught up in the French Revolution, and in attempts to bring radical democracy to Britain, Cooper nevertheless rose to become surgeon to royals from the Prince Regent to Queen Victoria. Setting the past against his own reactions to autopsies and operations, hospitals and poetry, Burch's Digging Up the Dead is a riveting account of a world of gothic horror as well as fertile idealism.
The Butchering Art

The Butchering Art

Author: Lindsey Fitzharris
Publisher: Scientific American / Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 0374117292
Pages: 304
Year: 2017-10-17
"Warning: She spares no detail!" —Erik Larson, bestselling author of Dead Wake A Top 10 Science Book of Fall 2017, Publishers Weekly "Fascinating and shocking." —Kirkus Reviews (starred review) The gripping story of how Joseph Lister’s antiseptic method changed medicine forever In The Butchering Art, the historian Lindsey Fitzharris reveals the shocking world of nineteenth-century surgery on the eve of profound transformation. She conjures up early operating theaters—no place for the squeamish—and surgeons, working before anesthesia, who were lauded for their speed and brute strength. These medical pioneers knew that the aftermath of surgery was often more dangerous than their patients’ afflictions, and they were baffled by the persistent infections that kept mortality rates stubbornly high. At a time when surgery couldn’t have been more hazardous, an unlikely figure stepped forward: a young, melancholy Quaker surgeon named Joseph Lister, who would solve the deadly riddle and change the course of history. Fitzharris dramatically recounts Lister’s discoveries in gripping detail, culminating in his audacious claim that germs were the source of all infection—and could be countered by antiseptics. Focusing on the tumultuous period from 1850 to 1875, she introduces us to Lister and his contemporaries—some of them brilliant, some outright criminal—and takes us through the grimy medical schools and dreary hospitals where they learned their art, the deadhouses where they studied anatomy, and the graveyards they occasionally ransacked for cadavers. Eerie and illuminating, The Butchering Art celebrates the triumph of a visionary surgeon whose quest to unite science and medicine delivered us into the modern world.
The Enlightened Mr. Parkinson: The Pioneering Life of a Forgotten Surgeon

The Enlightened Mr. Parkinson: The Pioneering Life of a Forgotten Surgeon

Author: Cherry Lewis
Publisher: Pegasus Books
ISBN: 168177495X
Pages: 336
Year: 2017-08-08
A colorful and absorbing portrait of James Parkinson and the turbulent, intellectually vibrant world of Georgian London. Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common forms of dementia, with 60,000 new cases each year in the United States alone, yet few know anything about the man the disease is named after. In 1817—two hundred years years ago—James Parkinson (1755–1824) defined this mysterious ailment so precisely that we still diagnose Parkinson's Disease today by recognizing the symptoms he identified. The story of this remarkable man’s contributions to the Age of the Enlightenment is told through his three seemingly disparate passions: medicine, politics and fossils. As a political radical, Parkinson was interrogated over a plot to kill King George III and was in danger of exile. But simultaneously, he was helping Edward Jenner set up smallpox vaccination stations across London and writing the first scientific study of fossils in English, jump-starting a national craze. He is one of the intellectual pioneers of "the age of wonder," forgotten to history, but Cherry Lewis restores this amazing man to his rightful place in history with her evocative portrait of the man and his era.