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Regulating Privacy

Regulating Privacy

Author: Colin J. Bennett
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501722131
Pages: 288
Year: 2018-07-05
The information revolution has brought with it the technology for easily collecting personal information about individuals, a facility that inherently threatens personal privacy. Colin J. Bennett here examines political responses to the data protection issue in four Western democracies, comparing legislation that the United States, Britain, West Germany, and Sweden forged from the late 1960's to the 1980's to protect citizens from unwanted computer dissemination of personal information. Drawing on an extensive body of interviews and documentary evidence, Bennett considers how the four countries, each with different cultural traditions and institutions, formulated fair information policy. He finds that their computer regulatory laws are based on strikingly similar statutory principles, but that enforcement of these principles varies considerably: the United States relies on citizen initiative and judicial enforcement; Britain uses a registration system; Germany has installed an ombudsman; and Sweden employs a licensing system. Tracing the impact of key social, political, and technological factors on the ways different political systems have controlled the collection and communication of information, Bennett also deepens our understanding of policymaking theory. Regulating Privacy will be welcomed by political sciences—especially those working in comparative public policy, American politics, organization theory, and technology and politics—political economists, information systems analysts, and others concerned with issues of privacy.
Regulating Privacy

Regulating Privacy

Author: Colin J. Bennett
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501722131
Pages: 288
Year: 2018-07-05
The information revolution has brought with it the technology for easily collecting personal information about individuals, a facility that inherently threatens personal privacy. Colin J. Bennett here examines political responses to the data protection issue in four Western democracies, comparing legislation that the United States, Britain, West Germany, and Sweden forged from the late 1960's to the 1980's to protect citizens from unwanted computer dissemination of personal information. Drawing on an extensive body of interviews and documentary evidence, Bennett considers how the four countries, each with different cultural traditions and institutions, formulated fair information policy. He finds that their computer regulatory laws are based on strikingly similar statutory principles, but that enforcement of these principles varies considerably: the United States relies on citizen initiative and judicial enforcement; Britain uses a registration system; Germany has installed an ombudsman; and Sweden employs a licensing system. Tracing the impact of key social, political, and technological factors on the ways different political systems have controlled the collection and communication of information, Bennett also deepens our understanding of policymaking theory. Regulating Privacy will be welcomed by political sciences—especially those working in comparative public policy, American politics, organization theory, and technology and politics—political economists, information systems analysts, and others concerned with issues of privacy.
Regulating Privacy

Regulating Privacy

Author: Colin J. Bennett
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801480108
Pages: 263
Year: 1992
The information revolution has brought with it the technology for easily collecting personal information about individuals, a facility that inherently threatens personal privacy. Colin J. Bennett here examines political responses to the data protection issue in four Western democracies, comparing legislation that the United States, Britain, West Germany, and Sweden forged from the late 1960's to the 1980's to protect citizens from unwanted computer dissemination of personal information. Drawing on an extensive body of interviews and documentary evidence, Bennett considers how the four countries, each with different cultural traditions and institutions, formulated fair information policy. He finds that their computer regulatory laws are based on strikingly similar statutory principles, but that enforcement of these principles varies considerably: the United States relies on citizen initiative and judicial enforcement; Britain uses a registration system; Germany has installed an ombudsman; and Sweden employs a licensing system. Tracing the impact of key social, political, and technological factors on the ways different political systems have controlled the collection and communication of information, Bennett also deepens our understanding of policymaking theory. Regulating Privacy will be welcomed by political sciences--especially those working in comparative public policy, American politics, organization theory, and technology and politics--political economists, information systems analysts, and others concerned with issues of privacy.
Regulating Privacy

Regulating Privacy

Author: Colin John Bennett
Publisher: Ithaca : Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801426111
Pages: 263
Year: 1992

Protectors of Privacy

Protectors of Privacy

Author: Abraham L. Newman
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501729217
Pages: 240
Year: 2018-07-05
From credit-card purchases to electronic fingerprints, the amount of personal data available to government and business is growing exponentially. All industrial societies face the problem of how to regulate this vast world of information, but their governments have chosen distinctly different solutions. In Protectors of Privacy, Abraham L. Newman details how and why, in contrast to the United States, the nations of the European Union adopted comprehensive data privacy for both the public and the private sectors, enforceable by independent regulatory agencies known as data privacy authorities. Despite U.S. prominence in data technology, Newman shows, the strict privacy rules of the European Union have been adopted far more broadly across the globe than the self-regulatory approach championed by the United States. This rift has led to a series of trade and security disputes between the United States and the European Union. Based on many interviews with politicians, civil servants, and representatives from business and NGOs, and supplemented with archival sources, statistical analysis, and examples, Protectors of Privacy delineates the two principal types of privacy regimes-comprehensive and limited. The book presents a theory of regulatory development that highlights the role of transgovernmental networks not only in implementing rules but also in actively shaping the political process surrounding policymaking. More broadly, Newman explains how Europe's institutional revolution has created in certain sectors the regulatory capacity that allows it to challenge U.S. dominance in international economic governance.
Transborder Data Flows and Data Privacy Law

Transborder Data Flows and Data Privacy Law

Author: Christopher Kuner
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0199674612
Pages: 312
Year: 2013-05-09
Written by a renowned expert on data protection law, this work examines the history, policies, and future of transborder data flow regulation, and is the only text to provide a detailed legal analysis of its global implications.
Privacy’s Blueprint

Privacy’s Blueprint

Author: Woodrow Hartzog
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674976002
Pages: 322
Year: 2018-04-09
Woodrow Hartzog develops the underpinning of a new kind of privacy law responsive to the way people actually perceive and use digital technologies. Rather than permit exploitation, it would demand encryption, prohibit malicious interfaces that deceive users and leave them vulnerable, and require safeguards against abuses of biometric surveillance.
Managing Privacy

Managing Privacy

Author: H. Jeff Smith
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469639890
Pages: 320
Year: 2017-11
The ongoing revolution in electronic information technology raises critical questions about our right to privacy. As more personal information is gathered and stored at breathtaking speed, corporate America is confronted with the ethical and practical issues of how to handle the information in its databases: how should it be safeguarded and who should have access to it? In Managing Privacy, Jeff Smith examines the policies of corporations such as insurance companies, banks, and credit card firms that regularly process medical, financial, and consumer data. According to Smith, many companies lack comprehensive policies regulating the access to and distribution of personal data, and where stated policies do exist, actual practices often conflict. Few organizations are willing to become leaders in the development of such policies, instead formulating privacy guidelines only after being pressured by consumers, the media, or legislators. Smith argues that as information technology advances, both corporations and society as a whole must modify their approaches to privacy protection, and he presents specific suggestions for developing such policies. Originally published in 1994. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.
Privacy on the Ground

Privacy on the Ground

Author: Kenneth A. Bamberger, Deirdre K. Mulligan
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262331357
Pages: 352
Year: 2015-10-23
Barely a week goes by without a new privacy revelation or scandal. Whether by hackers or spy agencies or social networks, violations of our personal information have shaken entire industries, corroded relations among nations, and bred distrust between democratic governments and their citizens. Polls reflect this concern, and show majorities for more, broader, and stricter regulation -- to put more laws "on the books." But there was scant evidence of how well tighter regulation actually worked "on the ground" in changing corporate (or government) behavior -- until now. This intensive five-nation study goes inside corporations to examine how the people charged with protecting privacy actually do their work, and what kinds of regulation effectively shape their behavior. And the research yields a surprising result. The countries with more ambiguous regulation -- Germany and the United States -- had the strongest corporate privacy management practices, despite very different cultural and legal environments. The more rule-bound countries -- like France and Spain -- trended instead toward compliance processes, not embedded privacy practices. At a crucial time, when Big Data and the Internet of Things are snowballing, Privacy on the Ground helpfully searches out the best practices by corporations, provides guidance to policymakers, and offers important lessons for everyone concerned with privacy, now and in the future.
Information Privacy Law

Information Privacy Law

Author: Daniel J. Solove, Paul Schwartz
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
ISBN: 1454860995
Pages: 1238
Year: 2014-12-08
A clear, comprehensive, and cutting-edge introduction to the field of information privacy law. Features: Extensive coverage of FTC privacy enforcement, HIPAA and HHS enforcement, standing in privacy lawsuits, among other topics. Four new chapters, including chapters devoted exclusively to data security, national security, employment privacy, and education privacy. The latest cases including those involving Hulu, Apple, Google, Snapchat, and others.New section on government surveillance and freedom to explore ideas. Extensive coverage of NSA, the Snowden revelations, and the ensuing litigation. Statutes and regulations now covered through compact summaries of the statutes/regulations with exposition interspersed with notes and questions or cases. This approach makes complicated laws like HIPAA and FCRA more engaging and easier to teach.
Regulating Spam

Regulating Spam

Author: Lodewijk F. Asscher, Sjo Anne Hoogcarspel
Publisher: Asser Press
ISBN:
Pages: 153
Year: 2006-06-08
This book presents an evaluation of recent legislative initiatives against unsolicited commercial e-mail ('spam') in the European Union. It provides an analysis of the meaning and interpretation of the new regulatory regime for unsolicited communications within the EU, and also addresses international aspects of the fight against spam, namely intra-European activities and supranational policies addressing the issue. It introduces some of the dilemmas of dealing with spam and the importance of effective enforcement mechanisms. The book aims to provide recommendations for further research as well as practical policy measures.
Boundaries of Privacy

Boundaries of Privacy

Author: Sandra Petronio
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 0791455157
Pages: 268
Year: 2002-10-10
Explores new ways to think about privacy and disclosure.
Regulating Code

Regulating Code

Author: Ian Brown, Christopher T. Marsden
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262312956
Pages: 288
Year: 2013-03-01
Internet use has become ubiquitous in the past two decades, but governments, legislators, and their regulatory agencies have struggled to keep up with the rapidly changing Internet technologies and uses. In this groundbreaking collaboration, regulatory lawyer Christopher Marsden and computer scientist Ian Brown analyze the regulatory shaping of "code" -- the technological environment of the Internet -- to achieve more economically efficient and socially just regulation. They examine five "hard cases" that illustrate the regulatory crisis: privacy and data protection; copyright and creativity incentives; censorship; social networks and user-generated content; and net neutrality. The authors describe the increasing "multistakeholderization" of Internet governance, in which user groups argue for representation in the closed business-government dialogue, seeking to bring in both rights-based and technologically expert perspectives. Brown and Marsden draw out lessons for better future regulation from the regulatory and interoperability failures illustrated by the five cases. They conclude that governments, users, and better functioning markets need a smarter "prosumer law" approach. Prosumer law would be designed to enhance the competitive production of public goods, including innovation, public safety, and fundamental democratic rights.
Unpopular Privacy

Unpopular Privacy

Author: Anita Allen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199913188
Pages: 280
Year: 2011-10-17
Can the government stick us with privacy we don't want? It can, it does, and according to Anita L. Allen, it may need to do more of it. Privacy is a foundational good, Allen argues, a necessary tool in the liberty-lover's kit for a successful life. A nation committed to personal freedom must be prepared to mandate privacy protections for its people, whether they eagerly embrace them or not. This unique book draws attention to privacies of seclusion, concealment, confidentiality and data-protection undervalued by their intended beneficiaries and targets--and outlines the best reasons for imposing them. Allen looks at laws designed to keep website operators from collecting personal information, laws that force strippers to wear thongs, and the myriad employee and professional confidentiality rules--including insider trading laws--that require strict silence about matters whose disclosure could earn us small fortunes. She shows that such laws recognize the extraordinary importance of dignity, trust and reputation, helping to preserve social, economic and political options throughout a lifetime.
Privacy: A Very Short Introduction

Privacy: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Raymond Wacks
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191038806
Pages: 160
Year: 2015-03-26
Some would argue that scarcely a day passes without a new assault on our privacy. In the wake of the whistle-blower Edward Snowden's revelations about the extent of surveillance conducted by the security services in the United States, Britain, and elsewhere, concerns about individual privacy have significantly increased. The Internet generates risks, unimagined even twenty years ago, to the security and integrity of information in all its forms. The manner in which information is collected, stored, exchanged, and used has changed forever; and with it, the character of the threats to individual privacy. The scale of accessible private data generated by the phenomenal growth of blogs, social media, and other contrivances of our information age pose disturbing threats to our privacy. And the hunger for gossip continues to fuel sensationalist media that frequently degrade the notion of a private domain to which we reasonably lay claim. In the new edition of this Very Short Introduction, Raymond Wacks looks at all aspects of privacy to include numerous recent changes, and considers how this fundamental value might be reconciled with competing interests such as security and freedom of expression. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.